Everyone loves a good convention!!

Photography Folio 1 2012

 

 

 

When choosing your Artist Models you also need to consider the conventions that you are going to use. There are three categories of conventions you need to consider: Drawing In (the gathering and resources), Technical (what techniques – more than one – are you going to explore) and the Pictorial Conventions (how to begin and extend the idea or develop the idea).

The list below is an outline provided by NZQA and are a guidelines to the various conventions that you can use. These are guidelines only and are not limited to just these.
Field Conventions for Visual Arts Standards

Conventions refer to the characteristics and constraints applicable, relevant and fitting to established practice within the fields of design, painting photography, printmaking and sculpture.
These include:
– drawing conventions: approaches and practices
– technical conventions: processes and procedures
– pictorial and conceptual conventions: ideas, themes, imagery and contexts

It is typically recommended that students explore the specific conventions of particular artist models and apply aspects of these in their own pictorial, personal investigations. The criteria are written to be inclusive of a wide range of approaches.
Below are indicative lists and may be expanded by teachers to encompass the particular pictorial,technical, thematic or conceptual concerns of specific artists and/or approaches to art-making.
Design
Drawing conventions include (but are not limited to):
Research, analysis, recording, concept visualisation, worksheets, roughs, mock-ups, prototypes, models, refinements, evaluative notes, solutions
Technical conventions include (but are not limited to):
Hand drawing, collage, watercolour, illustration, digital, typography (font, style, kerning, leading, stressed), layout, transformation, transparency, montage, posterisation, filters
Pictorial and conceptual conventions include (but are not limited to):
grunge, comic, handmade, corporate, illustrative, decorative, simplified, mechanical, organic, moving image, typographic, monochromatic, black and white, pictorial and typographic hierarchy, deconstructed, grid, symmetry/asymmetry, positive/negative balance, narrative, communicative purpose, target audience, production mode: magazine, billboard, video, packaging, DPS, letterhead, logo, masthead, poster, pillow book, website, gaming, advertising, promotion, video, industrial, fabric,architectural and landscape design

Painting
Drawing conventions include (but are not limited to):

Research, drawing notes, sketches, compositional plans, monochromatic and colour studies, collage, digital processes, painting, evaluative notes,
Technical conventions include (but are not limited to):
Wet and dry media, pencil, crayon, charcoal, conte, pen, ink, dye, paint, shellac, collage, shading, blending, scumbling, impasto, glazing, layering, drips, dry brush, scratching, graffito, spray paint, wiping, stencil, transfer, multimedia, installation, in situ, digital processes
Pictorial and conceptual conventions include (but are not limited to):
Abstract, figurative, cubist, minimal, decorative, narrative, post-modern, still life, vanitas, landscape, metaphorical, symbolic, portrait, expressive, gestural, hard edge, op, pop, political, historical, cultural, pattern making, surrealist, dada, grunge, street, bombing, graffiti, animation (eg Kentridge), perspective, grid, montage, morphing, juxtaposition (colour/image), monochrome

Photography
Drawing conventions include (but are not limited to):
Sketches, compositional notes, thumbnail concepts, proof sheets, working prints, photograms, pinhole, collage, montage, photographs, digital processes, evaluative notes
Technical conventions include (but are not limited to):
Contrast, grain, focus, exposure, shutter speed, aperture, light source, tilt-shift, etc for analogue (fixing, sandwich negatives, double exposure, dodging, burning, sepia, spotting, solarisation) and digital approaches (hue, saturation, contrast, posterisation, montage, selection, transformation,filters etc)
Pictorial and conceptual conventions include (but are not limited to):
Rule of thirds, diagonals, negative space, framing, viewpoint, sequencing, leading lines, depth of filed, motion blur, simplicity, texture, drama, narrative, black and white, monochrome, full colour, macro, panoramic, staged photography, multiple image, HDR (high dynamic range), studio,
surreal, symbolism, metaphor, portrait, figure, nude, landscape, architecture, still life, vanitas, political, cultural, documentary, sport, fashion, abstract, pattern making

Printmaking
Drawing conventions include (but are not limited to):

Research, sketches, drawing notes, technical experiments, concept and compositional plans, monochromatic and/or colour studies, collage, proofs, developmental and final prints, evaluativenotes
Technical conventions include (but are not limited to):
Woodcut, aquatint, collotype, etching, engraving, dry point, screen print, mono print, transfer, multimedia, lithography, letterpress, digiglyph, intaglio, hatching, mezzotint, graffito, relief print, stamp, digital processes, stencil, proof, edition, registration, embossing, line, tone, texture, pattern
Pictorial and conceptual conventions include (but are not limited to):
Abstract, figurative, floral, cubist, minimal, decorative, narrative, post-modern, still life, vanitas, landscape, metaphorical, symbolic, portrait, expressive, gestural, hard edge, op, pop, political, historical, cultural, pattern making, surrealist, dada, grunge, perspective, grid, montage, morphing, juxtaposition (colour/image), monochrome, reflection, rotation, repetition
Sculpture
Drawing conventions include (but are not limited to):

Research, drawing in two-dimensions, three-dimensions, sketches, drawing notes, worksheets, concepts, plans, models, maquettes, photo-collage, photo-documentation, digital processes, evaluative notes
Technical conventions include (but are not limited to):
Carving, casting, modelling, relief, assemblage, bound, wrapped, tied, welded, glue, stitching, sewing, found materials, ceramic, glass, marble, stone, wood, wire, paper, card, string, bronze, steel, iron, clay, wax, water, plastic, sound, light, movement, performance, video, projection
Conceptual conventions include (but are not limited to):
Tension, compression, suspension, repetition, scale, installation, figurative, abstract, geometric, organic, hard, soft, linear, mass, narrative, symbolic, political, social, satire, cultural, personal, environmental, site specific, dada, readymade, conceptual, post-modern, 2D, 3D, 4D time-based
approaches such as kinetics, performance, mechanical works and natural processes

Cultural Conventions (1.5, 2.5, 3.5)

Cultural conventions are defined as the customs, formalities, practices and protocols that relate to the shared knowledge and values of a specific society, cultural or ethnic group. Traditional and/or contemporary practices may include: whakairo, salon painting, street art, siapo, tukutuku,
tattooing, knitting, mask making, tivaevae, jewellery making. Skills appropriate to cultural conventions could include:

knowledge of processes and procedures specific to the cultural context
thinking through the use of materials and processes
planning and development of ideas that contribute to the final work
collaborative and/or other protocols appropriate to the cultural context.

Click to access 2012-Pictorial-and-Technical-Conventions-for-Visual-Arts-Fields.pdf

http://www.nzqa.govt.nz/qualifications-standards/qualifications/ncea/subjects/visual-arts/visual-arts-annotated-exemplars/

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